The singer solution to world poverty by peter singer rhetorical analysis essay

Singer introduces himself as a utilitarian philosopher. In the morning Dora resolves to take the boy back. He writes with a great deal of conviction on the subject. An accusatory tone resonates throughout the text.

Don't we run the risk that many will shrug their shoulders and say that morality, so conceived, is fine for saints but not for them?

Singer wants the reader to praise the actions of Dora and denounce the actions of Bob. What are the most effective aspects of Singer's Argument? Throughout the essay, Peter Singer uses appeals to pathos to convince the reader that any money left after necessities have been accounted for should be given to charitable organizations that provide aid for those in poverty.

The essay itself was pretty effective in my opinion it provided with enough facts and the author was able to put his own personal touch to it by putting emotion into his words.

Analysis on The Singer Solution to World Poverty

Looking farther down the track, he sees the small figure of a child very likely to be killed by the runaway train. The child is killed. Each use of a textual tactic is a means to the end goal of persuading Americans to donate.

As he does so, he sees that a runaway train, with no one aboard, is running down the railway track. So, if we condemn Bob for not saving the child, how can we not condemn all of the people with surplus wealth who do not donate a dollar?

Singer makes a distinction between Dora's situation and Bob's situation. The first hypothetical situation comes from the Brazilian film, Central Station, and involves a retired schoolteacher, Dora, who has the opportunity to make a quick thousand dollars.

Peter Singer provides an appeal to ethos in the tone that he uses in writing the essay. Secondly, just as the consequence of Bob not flipping the switch was that the child died, the consequence of people not donating to help poor children results in children dying.

Rhetorical questions are used a lot when he wants to get his reader thinking about what they are doing right now and what has been done. It is assumed that the reader has enough income to make a donation.

Singer uses Bob to conclude the essay as well. If that makes living a morally decent life extremely arduous, well, then that is the way things are.

Readers find themselves looking inward for the answer to his deeper conversation that arises, which is the idea of whether donating defines morality. The language that he uses is very readable, direct, and matter-of-fact.

And what is one month's dining out, compared to a child's life? His use of imagery also helped to convey an effective message because it gave the reader a clear image of what happens when you don't help a child out. Are you therefore obliged to keep giving until you have nothing left?

Which means that if people really don't want to donate it doesn't matter if they read this essay or ten others it wont really change anything.

The Singer Solution to World Poverty

One of the more subtle design elements appears in-between paragraphs. Dora had actually been face to face with the child whom she could save whereas Bob had not. Singer's argument, though, loses its persuasion towards the end. One day when Bob is out for a drive, he parks the Bugatti near the end of a railway siding and goes for a walk up the track.

However, instead of linking them to an individual, Singer assigns them to the United States Government. Now, evolutionary psychologists tell us that human nature just isn't sufficiently altruistic to make it plausible that many people will sacrifice so much for strangers.

Singer introduces himself as a utilitarian philosopher. Yet for a utilitarian philosopher like myself —that is, one who judges whether acts are right or wrong by their consequences— if the upshot of the American's failure to donate the money is that one more kid dies on the streets of a Brazilian city, then it is, in some sense, just as bad as selling the kid to the organ peddlers.

By revealing himself in this light, Singer also adds credibility or an appeal to ethos. Perhaps Dora knew this all along, but after her neighbor's plain speaking, she spends a troubled night.

The language used suggests that Singer has adopted the expectation that the reader will donate, otherwise they will either pass self-judgment or risk moral judgment from others. His article, published on September 5, in The New York Times Magazine, poses several hypothetical and dramatized situations which he uses as comparisons concerning Americans who do not donate excess income.

The already mentioned parts of Singer's argument are the strongest and most persuasive found in the essay.In the essay “The Singer Solution to World Poverty,” philosopher Peter Singer addresses the issue of poverty by suggesting Americans give away most of their income to aid those in need.

Singer believes that withholding income is the equivalence of letting a child starve to death.

Analysis on The Singer Solution to World Poverty

In Peter Singer’s New York Times article entitled, “The Singer Solution to World Poverty” he challenges citizens of first world countries to donate any money that is not used for day to day necessities to go towards charities that help feed, clothe, and medicate people in extreme poverty.

Sep 05,  · the singer solution to world poverty**Essay by Peter Singer, Australian philosopher, offers his unconventional thoughts about ordinary American's. Peter Singer also used skills and devices that helped him get his message across to everyone.

The use of rhetorical questions, repetition, Imagery are very present throughout the essay. Rhetorical questions are used a lot when he wants to get his reader thinking.

The Singer Solution to World Poverty remember Rhetorical Devices. ETHOS credibility of the author PATHOS emotional appeal LOGOS logical appeal Example- Actor Will Smith at the Live 8 Concert () APPEALING TO: PATHOS: Will Smith wears a Nelson Mandela shirt which elicits an emotional appeal from the audience.

In the essay “The Singer Solution to World Poverty,” philosopher Peter Singer addresses the issue of poverty by suggesting Americans give away most of their income to aid those in need.

Singer believes that withholding income is the equivalence of .

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The singer solution to world poverty by peter singer rhetorical analysis essay
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